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KTRK(SANTA FE, Texas) -- Survivors of the Santa Fe High School shooting held a press conference Friday in which they detailed what they believe needs to be done to ensure safety in schools and other public places.

The students, many of whom participated in the March for Our Lives rally in response to the Valentine's Day shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, appeared alongside several members March for Our Lives Houston chapter.

Santa Fe High School junior Megan McGuire told reporters that her goal is to prevent another community from having to endure the same tragedy they are currently going through. McGuire referenced the Sandy Hook and Parkland shootings before touching on the tragedy that recently struck her hometown.

"The truth is that, whatever we are doing as a society, or not doing, is not working," she said. "Inaction is not an option. We must do something, and we must do it right."

The students agreed that school safety is a complex issue but introduced solutions that could contribute to a safer society overall.

Striving for gun safety

McGuire and Santa Fe High School senior Bree Butler both emphasized that they're not trying to take guns away from citizens, acknowledging that they are strong proponents for the Second Amendment and that their fathers are gun owners themselves.

"When I say gun safety, I don't mean take away responsible owner's guns," McGuire said.

McGuire said she simply wants to see "common-sense solutions" put into place to "keep those who wish to harm themselves or others from obtaining guns."

The students want to create a law in the state of Texas for owners to lock up their guns responsibly, so that they do not fall into the hands of children or those who are not mature enough to handle them.

In addition, the students believe it should be the law to report when guns are stolen or go missing and that mental health evaluations and background checks -- for not only the gun owner but his or her family as well -- should be required when purchasing a gun.

Kennedy Rodriguez, a senior at Santa Fe High School, said that if the government is able to regulate cars, which can also kill people when used improperly, "We can have laws and regulations about guns."

"Vote ... it's the most important thing you can do."


The students recently traveled to Austin, the capital of Texas, to speak to lawmakers about a bill they are drafting that would turn the suggestions they discussed into law.

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott and other politicians were "very receptive" at what the students had to say, Butler said.

Marcel McClinton, a representative for March for Our Lives Houston, said it's "important to note" that the bill speaks to rural, conservative communities in Texas where gun ownership is prominent among citizens.

If the bill is signed into law, it "can make sure that nobody goes through the pain and suffering that we are going through right now," Butler said, instructing citizens to vote out out the lawmakers who "do not believe in this."

"Vote ... it's the most important thing you can do," she said, vowing to "make a change."

McGuire had a message for politicians who believe they can skirt around the issue and "think that doing nothing is acceptable."

"My thought is that, if you do not do something, you do not have a prayer of being elected," she said. "My generation will see to that."

'We've all been bullied'


On the morning of May 18, 17-year-old Dimitrios Pagourtzis allegedly opened fire into multiple classroom, killing eight students and two teachers.

Pagourtzis' father, Antonios Pagourtzis, likened his son to a victim himself, describing him as a "good boy" who was "bullied at school" in an interview on Monday. Dimitrios Pagourtzis' attorney, Nick Poehl, also told ABC News on Monday that students had informed him that Pagourtzis had been bullied.

The students mostly declined to answer questions about the alleged gunman or the lawsuit filed against the Pagourtzis family, but they were adamant in saying that bullying is not an excuse to shoot up a school.

"We've all been bullied," Butler said, adding that she herself experienced a "really rough" period of bullying in eighth grade.

While Butler said it's essential to "be nice to everyone around you no matter what," she emphasized that, in the context of the shooting at her school, "This is a mental health issue."

"Everybody that's bullied doesn't shoot a school," she said. "This shouldn't be, 'Oh, he was bullied. He's a victim.' He made victims."

McGuire said that, without speaking on behalf of the alleged gunman, "Bullying is not an excuse, at all."

Returning to the scene

Classes at Santa Fe High School will resume on Tuesday, and the students are looking forward to resuming their routine and seeing their friends and teachers, they said.

Butler said seniors were given the option to not return, but she has made the decision to go so she can have closure.

"I don't want that day to be the last day I ever set foot in my high school," she said. "But, also, I'm worried. I'm kind of scared."

McGuire said she's worried about her safety when she returns on Tuesday and for her senior year in the fall.

"It will be a very emotional process," she said. "I'm glad I get to see my teachers and friends at the school. It's been very hard to see them and talk to them in a way that isn't rushed."

The students suggested that metal detectors, more school resource officers and having a licensed therapist on campus -- rather than just counselors who are trained mainly to help students get into college -- could contribute to a safer school environment.

McClinton described the Santa Fe students as "inspirational, dedicated and passionate leaders" who are destined to "create change."

"Change is coming," McClinton said. "Children are dying."

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moodboard/Thinkstock(RICHMOND, Va.) -- Police tased and then fatally shot a naked man after a confrontation on a Virginia highway earlier this month.

Richmond police released the body camera footage of the May 14 incident today.

The footage shows police approaching a car that had been driven off a highway, with an officer ordering the driver to stay in the car.

The officer is heard telling someone on a radio that the person "seems to be mentally unstable."

Moments later, the naked driver, later identified as Marcus-David Peters, runs out of the car towards the highway. He was struck by a car and begins rolling around the highway.

The approaching officer is seen holding a yellow taser. Peters gets up from the ground and starts walking towards the officer. He is heard saying "back the f--- up... put the taser down or I'll kill you."

Peters, 24, then rushes the officer, with the officer yelling for him to back up. At that point in the video, it appears the officer has the yellow taser in his left hand and a black handgun in his right. Two shots are fired, and then Peters runs away from the officer.

Once the two men are separated and another law enforcement officer appears to ask the officer if he tased Peters. The officer wearing the body camera says "I tried to but it didn't work," before radioing in "shots fired." As he and the other law enforcement officer start to walk towards Peters, who had collapsed on the ground at that point, the officer shouts "f---!"

Richmond police chief Alfred Durham said that the investigation is ongoing and asked the community for their patience, the Associated Press reports.

A still image taken from a police body camera shows a police officer pointing his gun at Marcus-David Peters on May 14, 2018, in Richmond, Va.

The AP reported that police have identified the officer wearing the body camera as Michael Nyantakyi, who has been a police officer for 10 years. Nyantakyi, like Peters, is black.

Peters' sister Princess Blanding spoke to the media after the police chief released the video today, telling reporters that her brother had no known mental health issues, the AP reports.

"I cannot diagnose my brother, as he’s not here to be diagnosed," Blanding said, the AP reported. "However, he was clearly in distress and in need of help, and the help was not rendered."

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iStock/Thinkstock(SANTA CLARITA, Calif.) -- A man in a California hospital who thought he'd have to miss his twins' high school graduation got a nice surprise from nurses and staff.

Initially David Bernstein of Santa Clarita said Thursday that staff at Henry Mayo Newhall Memorial had told him he'd need to move into a new room.

But when he was wheeled into the new room, he noticed that the room had been decorated with balloons, treats and signs of graduation congratulations.

The staff had also set up a Wi-Fi connection in the room so that he could watch as his 18-year-old twin children, Michael and Valerie Bernstein, walked across the stage at Saugus High School.

"It was overwhelming -- the decorations and the cake," David Bernstein told ABC station KABC-TV on Thursday.

He'd been hospitalized earlier that week but had hoped to be released in time for the graduation. When he learned that he'd actually have to remain in the hospital, David Bernstein said he was "devastated."

His wife, Diane, said she cried in the room when they got the news. She said the nurses and staff had felt badly for the Bernsteins and sought to do something to help them.

"They got a dedicated Wi-Fi line for him and put him in a different room so he was by himself. ... They had it all decorated. ... I was just so touched," Diane Bernstein said. "They were very nice."

She said the twins' college graduation had been a long-awaited milestone, particularly because Michael and Valerie Bernstein were born prematurely at 27 weeks. Both parents said it was a team effort raising the two; David Bernstein remembered making as many as 21 bottles of formula a night for the twins in preparation for the next day.

"A lot of people helped us out. My wife did an amazing job," he said. "They've [Michael and Valerie] grown up to be tall kids and good health and they make good grades in school so very proud."

Both Valerie and Michael Bernstein said their father was missed at the ceremony.

"He's worked with me so much over the years," Valerie Bernstein said. "I am so grateful for him."

"It's something that we've looked forward to," Diane Bernstein said. "They did exceptionally well in school. ... We're very proud of both of them."

On Thursday, as he watched the graduation via livestream, David Bernstein got emotional, saying that he'd thought about this moment for a long time.

"I really wanted to go," he said. "It's been a long time coming. We've made it to a new level. And, it's just a first step in life so more to come. ... Michael and Valerie, very proud of them."

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iStock/Thinkstock(NOBLESVILLE, Ind.) -- When a middle school boy allegedly opened fire at his Indiana school, the science teacher immediately ran and tackled him to the ground, one student in the classroom told ABC News.

The suspected shooter, a student at Noblesville West Middle School, asked to be excused from class Friday morning and then returned to the room armed with two handguns, Noblesville police said.

"He pulled the gun out of his pocket and everyone started screaming, and trying to get behind stuff, like the desks and tables. And he started shooting," seventh-grader Ethan Stonebraker, 13, told ABC News.

The teacher had a basketball in his hands and immediately launched it at the gunman, and then ran toward the bullets, Ethan said.

"Immediately [teacher] Mr. [Jason] Seaman was yelling and running right at him and tackled him to the ground," Ethan said. "I was trying to stay crouched behind the back table, but also see what’s going on and that’s when [Mr. Seaman] was running right at him with this arms in front of him, and then he just tackled him against the wall.

"Then they were on the ground after [Mr. Seaman] swatted the gun from him and he just laid on the shooter so he couldn’t do anything," Ethan said. "We got behind the back table in the corner of the room, and most people were just crouched covering their heads, but some people were trying to peer over the table and make sure they could see what’s going on."

The teacher and one student were shot and hospitalized, police said.

Authorities did not identify the victims and did not provide their conditions, but multiple students identified the teacher as Jason Seaman.

Seaman was struck three times and underwent surgery, according to a Facebook post by his mother.

Seaman’s wife, Colette Seaman, provided a statement to ABC News on behalf of her husband: “First of all, thank you to the first responders from Noblesville and Fishers for their immediate action and care. I want to let everyone know that I was injured but am doing great. To all the students, you are all wonderful and I thank you for your support. You are the reason I teach.”

The suspect, who wasn't injured and was not identified, was taken into custody, police said.

"He’s very brave, he’s a hero today," Ethan said of his teacher. "And he did something that most people would never dare to do.

"If it wasn’t for him ... a lot of us could have been hurt," Ethan continued. "He pretty much protected all of us and it’s something that you couldn’t ask more of."

Ethan described the suspected gunman as "a nice kid most of the times."

"He’s funny, making jokes with most kids and stuff," Ethan said. "He’s in all my classes and it’s just a shock that he would do something like that."

Ethan said he never thought a school shooting "would somehow get that close to you."

"But then when it happens you want it to somehow be prevented from happening again," he said. "You want laws passed or more security."

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Albert L. Ortega/Getty Images(LOS ANGELES) -- The man who accused George Takei of sexual misconduct a few months ago told ABC News Friday afternoon that despite a recent report to the contrary, he is standing by his original story.

Scott Brunton said that although the The Observer reported that he'd walked back his claim that he was groped by Takei in one night in 1981, he specifically remembers waking up to find the "Star Trek" actor on top of him, trying to remove his underwear.

Though he does not specifically recall Takei touching his genitals, he says he cannot be certain that it did not happen, as he was unconscious for a period of time when they were alone.

"In my mind, there are so many different definitions of groping -- there are different degrees," he said. "When you're yanking on someone's front and back of their underwear, you can't avoid contact."

The Observer author also noted several inconsistencies in interviews Brunton had done, though Brunton explained that some details, such as his weight at that time, merely got away from him, while others, like whether he and Takei ever met again, could be chalked up to a miscommunication.

The question of whether Brunton remembered being groped had been a key point to the Observer author in evaluating Brunton’s claim of sexual misconduct, in part because toxicologists he consulted concluded that Brunton hadn’t been drugged. In the end, the author had characterized the behavior described by Brunton as “making too bold a move on a date who, it turned out, just wanted to be friends.”

Takei, who'd denied molesting Brunton, tweeted the article shortly after its publication. His publicist referred to Takei's statements on social media in light of Brunton's new comments.

"As many of you know, this has been a very difficult period for myself and my husband Brad as we have dealt with the impact of these accusations, but we are happy to see that this nightmare is finally drawing to a close," Takei wrote. "As I stated before, I do not remember Mr. Brunton or any of the events he described from 40 years ago, but I do understand that this was part of a very important national conversation that we as a society must have, painful as it might be.

"It is in that spirit that I want folks to know, despite what he has put us through, I do not bear Mr. Brunton any ill will, and I wish him peace," he continued. "Brad and I are especially grateful for the many fans who stood by me throughout this ordeal. Your support kept us going, and we are so immensely thankful for you."

Brunton, a former model, initially told The Hollywood Reporter that after he'd met Takei, now 81, at a bar, the actor invited him back to his home for a nightcap. There, he said, he became "disoriented and dizzy" after having two drinks, and it was then, he claimed, the actor fondled him.

"I came to and said, 'What are you doing?!' I said, 'I don't want to do this.' He goes, 'You need to relax. I am just trying to make you comfortable. Get comfortable.' And I said, 'No. I don't want to do this.' And I pushed him off, and he said, 'OK, fine,'" Brunton said. "And I said, 'I am going to go, and he said, 'If you feel you must. You're in no condition to drive.' I said, 'I don't care I want to go.'"

Takei, who is best known for playing Hikaru Sulu on the original "Star Trek" television series, tweeted that he did not remember ever meeting Brunton, and "the events he describes back in the 1980s simply did not occur."

"Right now it is a he said / he said situation, over alleged events nearly 40 years ago," Takei wrote. "But those that know me understand that non-consensual acts are so antithetical to my values and my practices, the very idea that someone would accuse me of this is quite personally painful."

Brunton told ABC News that he does not understand Takei's claim, and is hoping for an apology. He also wants to clear his own name.

"I have friends around the world, people I went to school with, basically calling me a liar," he said. "It's really, really disturbing."

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iStock/Thinkstock(PORTLAND) -- Multiple people have been injured in a hit-and-run crash in Portland, Oregon, according to police.

Three women were struck around 10 a.m. and transported to local hospitals, the Portland Police Department said in a press conference. Two of the women were injured critically, and the other suffered non-life-threatening injuries, according to police.

The crash happened near Portland State University, The Associated Press reported. The victims were walking on the sidewalk when they were struck, police said.

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Google Maps(SYRACUSE, N.Y.) -- A 30-year-old man ordered by a judge to move out of his parents' home in upstate New York has been offered a job and a starting bonus by a restaurant chain.

Villa Italian Kitchen apparently thinks Michael Rotondo would fit its recipe for success. The chain wrote in a Facebook post that "it's tough out there," particularly for millennials, and offered the young man a store-level job and training at any of its 250 locations worldwide.

The company also decided to offer him a "signing bonus" of $1,101, saying it would beat an offer of $1,100 from his parents, an apparent reference to money Rotondo's parents, Mark and Christina Rotondo, gave their son earlier this year to help him move out.

Michael Rotondo told "Good Morning America" this week that he accepted the money but spent it on "other things."

The 30-year-old had been living rent-free at his parents' home in Camillus, New York, near Syracuse, when they asked a court to force him to leave. A State Supreme Court judge ruled in the parents' favor Tuesday, ordering him to move out.

Villa Italian Kitchen wrote in its post, "Offer from us is on the table for $1,101 to come join our team. Consider it a signing bonus. We gotchu, bud,"

(MORE: 30-year-old ordered to vacate parents' home claims they harassed him)

"We feel that millennials catch a lot flack for everything from being lazy to killing department stores, but in reality, it can be difficult to start a career so we decided to try to help Michael out," Villa Italian Kitchen COO Andrew Steinberg told ABC News. Steinberg, who has been with the restaurant for 21 years confirmed the chain has reached out to Rotondo, "but have not received a response yet."

"The offer is still on the table and we would be happy to discuss this opportunity with him if he is interested," he said.

The closest Villa Italian Kitchen location to Camillus, New York, is in Waterloo, according to Steinberg, which is about 30 miles away.

"We are always looking for people who want to make a difference and who are looking for their 'piece of the pie,' whether they live in a penthouse or their parents’ house," Steinberg said. "We believe that with the right training and a supportive atmosphere, Michael has the potential to be a successful employee."

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WSB(ATLANTA) -- A Georgia police officer is being called a hero after he saved a baby from choking.

Marietta officer Nick St. Onge responded to a 911 call May 15 from a woman who said her 2-month-old infant was conscious but not breathing, according to a statement by the Marietta Police Department.

The act was caught on dashcam and bodycam footage.

Officer St. Onge, a five-year veteran of the department, arrived at the scene to find a woman standing in the parking lot, holding the baby, police said.

The woman holding the baby was Kianna Dorsey, her grandmother.

“She only had a bottle,” Dorsey is heard saying in the video. “That’s all she had.”

The baby appeared lifeless and was turning blue, police said. Officer St. Onge began CPR, using chest thrusts and back blows to try and clear the baby’s airways.

“There we go. Come on, baby. Come on,” St. Onge says in the video.

After a couple minutes, police said, the infant started to respond to the CPR, crying and breathing irregularly

St. Onge had recently taken a CPR class in February that helped him during this incident, he told ABC Atlanta affiliate WSB-TV.

Fire department paramedics arrived shortly afterward and took over.

Dorsey called St. Onge the family’s hero.

But the officer said, “I’m just the guy who showed up to do what he had to do.”

The baby was released from the hospital and is home with her family.

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Galveston County Sheriff(SANTA FE, Texas) -- The parents of a 17-year-old boy gunned down in the Santa Fe High School shooting are suing the parents of the suspected teen shooter, alleging the suspect's mother and father were grossly negligent for failing to properly secure their guns and keep them out of the hands of a "monstrous murderer."

Dimitrios Pagourtzis, 17, allegedly burst into the Texas school May 18 with a shotgun and a .38-caliber revolver, both of which are legally owned by his father, where he "coldly and calculating shot and brutally murdered Christopher Jake Stone and numerous other innocent victims," according to the lawsuit filed by Stone's parents, Christopher Stone and Rosie Yanas.

Christopher Jake Stone and the nine others killed had the "innocent but terrible misfortune to be in the same school at the same time as the monstrous murderer who rampaged among them," according to the lawsuit, filed Thursday in Galveston County, Texas. "As each bullet ripped home, gone in an instant were lives not fulfilled, marriages not happening, children not born, the ripple effect of so many good people touching the lives of others stilled forever."

Stone's parents say Pagourtzis' parents were negligent for failing to properly secure the guns, letting Pagourtzis have access to the guns and ammunition, failing to get mental health counseling and services for their son, failing to properly warn the public about their son's "dangerous propensities," as well as "negligently entrusting their weapons" to him.

Stone's parents also claim gross negligence for the parents’ allegedly letting their son access their guns.

If the suspect didn't have the guns available to him, "his hidden black rage might well have continued to simmer within, but, the life's blood of his teachers and peers... would not have been so horribly, callously and needlessly spilled," the lawsuit said.

The suspect's father, Antonios Pagourtzis, told Greece's Antenna TV last weekend that he thinks his son may have been bullied, saying, “My son, to me, is not a criminal, he's a victim.” He also said his son never showed signs of violence.

While it was Pagourtzis who allegedly pulled the trigger, the lawsuit alleges that "pressed just as firmly were the fingers of his parents who utterly failed to teach their son any respect for life whatsoever and who negligently and grossly negligently failed to secure their weapons in a reasonable and prudent way and put them directly and proximately into use as authors of community-wide tragedy and incomprehensible loss."

"We are as shocked and confused as anyone else by these events," the Pagourtzis family said in a statement Saturday. "We are gratified by the public comments made by other Santa Fe High School students that show Dimitri as we know him: a smart, quiet, sweet boy. While we remain mostly in the dark about the specifics of yesterday’s tragedy, what we have learned from media reports seems incompatible with the boy we love."

"We extend our most heartfelt prayers and condolences to all of the victims," the Pagourtzis family said. "We also wish to thank all the first responders from all over Texas that assisted in rendering aid and support."

"We share the public’s hunger for answers as to why this happened, and will await the outcome of the investigation before speaking about these events," the family said. "We have been and will continue to cooperate with the authorities conducting the investigation, and ask for the public’s patience while it moves forward."

Pagourtzis, who is charged with capital murder, has been held at the Galveston County Jail without bond.

His attorneys filed a motion Wednesday requesting that a "reasonable bond" be set. The attorneys argue that Pagourtzis has a constitutional right to a reasonable bail and they, furthermore, state that his family has the means to post that bail.

Pagourtzis' attorneys did not specify what they consider a "reasonable bond" to be.

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Steven Ferdman/Getty Images(NEW YORK CITY) -- Disgraced producer Harvey Weinstein turned himself into police Friday morning in New York to face rape and sexual abuse charges before being released on bail.

But just six months ago, Weinstein was one of the biggest power players in Hollywood. Then, it all came crashing down.

Weinstein has maintained his innocence since late last year, with his representation stating time and again, "Any allegations of nonconsensual sex are unequivocally denied by Mr. Weinstein ... Mr. Weinstein believes that all of these relationships were consensual."

So how did the 66-year-old go from Oscar winner to pariah, who will now face possible jail time if convicted?

Here's a look at how everything went down:

Oct. 5 - The New York Times runs the first story

"Harvey Weinstein paid off sexual harassment accusers for decades," was the headline of an explosive story in the Times, alleging that several women had over nearly three decades accused the producer of sexual harassment or unwanted physical contact.

Weinstein admitted wrongdoing in a statement to ABC News at the time and revealed that he'd be taking a leave of absence from his company.

But he also fired back at the Times through his attorney, Charles Harder, who said the newspaper story is "saturated with false and defamatory statements."

Oct. 8 - Weinstein out


As more victims took to social media and to other news outlets to share their stories of alleged abuse at the hands of the producer, Weinstein's very own company decided to cut ties with him.

"In light of new information about misconduct by Harvey Weinstein that has emerged in the past few days, the directors of The Weinstein Company -- Robert Weinstein, Lance Maerov, Richard Koenigsberg and Tarak Ben Ammar -- have determined, and have informed Harvey Weinstein, that his employment with The Weinstein Company is terminated, effective immediately," a statement from the company's board of directors to ABC News said.

Oct. 10 - "Harvey Weinstein’s Accusers Tell Their Stories"

A second explosive story written by Ronan Farrow was published in The New Yorker. The piece featured a number of Weinstein's accusers -- including Asia Argento, Lucia Evans and Mira Sorvino -- sharing their stories of alleged abuse and harassment. At that point, the number of accusers against the producer had climbed into the dozens.

Oct. 10 - Weinstein's wife speaks out, leaves him


In a statement to People magazine, Georgina Chapman, the producer's wife of 10 years, announced she is leaving her husband.

“My heart breaks for all the women who have suffered tremendous pain because of these unforgivable actions. I have chosen to leave my husband. Caring for my young children is my first priority and I ask the media for privacy at this time,” she told the magazine.

Oct. 14 - Expelled from the academy, more bans to follow

Following the mounting allegations against him, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences voted to expel Weinstein.

"The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences Board of Governors met today to discuss the allegations against Harvey Weinstein, and has voted well in excess of the required two-thirds majority to immediately expel him from the Academy," the organization said in a statement.

A couple weeks later, Weinstein was banned for life from the Producers Guild of America on Oct. 30.

Nov. 3 - NYPD looking into Weinstein

The New York Police Department told the media that there is enough evidence to arrest Weinstein for rape but that no warrant has been issued.

The chief of detectives said that though “we have an actual case” and there may be probable cause to arrest Weinstein, there was not yet enough information to seek an arrest warrant.

Nov. 15 - Weinstein sued for assault

An unnamed actress filed a lawsuit against Weinstein and The Weinstein Co. alleging that the disgraced media mogul sexually assaulted her twice.

The complaint, filed in Los Angeles County Superior Court by attorney Gloria Allred on behalf of "Jane Doe," alleges sexual battery and assault by Weinstein.

Jan. 10 - Weinstein slapped by patron during dinner

While living in Arizona, out of the spotlight weeks after the scandal broke, Weinstein was slapped in the face by a patron during dinner.

After slapping the producer in the face twice, the man yells, "You're such a piece of s--- for what you did to these women."

April 30 - Ashley Judd sues Weinstein

Judd, one of Weinstein's accusers, files a lawsuit against him, claiming that he damaged her career by blocking her from getting major movie roles in retaliation for turning down his advances.

"I lost career opportunity. I lost money. I lost status and prestige and power in my career as a direct result of having been sexually harassed and rebuffing the sexual harassment," Judd said. "My career opportunities, after having been defamed by Harvey Weinstein, were significantly diminished."

May 25 - Weinstein turns himself in

Weinstein turned himself into police to face rape and sexual misconduct charges, before being released on $1 million cash bail.

"Today’s charges reflect significant progress in this active, ongoing investigation," Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance said in a statement. "I thank the brave survivors who have come forward, and my office’s prosecutors who have worked tirelessly on this investigation."

Weinstein's attorney Benjamin Brafman told reporters after the hearing that his client will enter a plea of not guilty on all the charges brought against him. They have known about the investigation for several months and the charges "are not factually supported by the evidence,” Brafman added.

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iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- Poppy flowers will add a huge flash of color to the National Mall this Memorial Day weekend.

A pop-up installation of 645,000 red flowers, encased in a translucent structure, were installed Thursday night and will adorn the southwestern side of the Lincoln Memorial Reflecting Pool.

The "Poppy Memorial" by the United Services Automobile Association and the National Parks Service is on display near the Lincoln, Korean War and World War II memorials to honor men and women who died while serving in the U.S. military since World War I.

Each poppy flower symbolizes a life of a fallen service member and their sacrifice.

"The Poppy Memorial visualizes the magnitude of that sacrifice and reminds us all of the price that was paid," said Retired Vice Admiral John Bird, the automobile association's senior vice president of military affairs. "We are grateful to the National Park Service for allowing us to display this inspiring and educational exhibit among the permanent monuments, as a testament to the enduring bravery of our men and women in uniform."

The abundance of poppies was inspired by the World War I poem, "In Flanders Field."

A portion of the poem reads, "In Flanders fields the poppies blow / Between the crosses, row on row, / That mark our place, and in the sky, / The larks, still bravely singing, fly, / Scarce heard amid the guns below. / We are the dead; short days ago / We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow, / Loved and were loved, and now we lie / In Flanders fields."

The temporary monument stretches 133 feet long and is 8.5 feet tall. Its flowers were provided by the Veterans of Foreign Wars and the American Legion Family.

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ABC News(OKLAHOMA CITY) -- Not one, but two men ran to their respective cars to grab their guns when a shooter opened fire at an Oklahoma City restaurant Thursday.

Police Capt. Bo Matthews said Friday that both of those men, who have not been publicly identified, shot suspect Alexander C. Tilghman on Thursday. Tilghman died as a result of those gunshots.

Before being killed by the two civilians, Tilghman fired shots into Louie's Grill & Bar near Lake Hefner on Thursday. He shot three people, all of whom are expected to survive, Matthews said.

Immediately after the shooting, Matthews told the media that a single civilian shot the suspect, but upon further investigation, it was determined that two men both shot the suspect. The two men who shot Tilghman "were not carrying their firearms on them, they [their firearms] were in their vehicles," Matthews said today.

When asked what he would call the two men, Matthew described them as "two people that stopped a very tragic situation from going any further."

During the news conference today, Matthews wouldn't directly call them "heroes" but said that it was "a great terminology" for the media to use.

"You can say they're heroes, which is a very good thing to say," Matthews said.

The two men did not know one another and had arrived at the restaurant separately, he said.

Matthews said that because the men were not carrying their weapons on them, conceal carry laws would not be applicable in the case. He did not disclose any information about whether or not they had such licenses, and said that it would be up to the district attorney to decide if they face any charges for their actions, but hinted that he does not expect a case to be brought against them.

"These guys were protecting somebody else's life. I would think more than likely they would not be filed on," Matthews said.

Tilghman, 28, was reportedly wearing shooting glasses and earmuffs commonly seen at gun ranges, Matthews said.

"It looks like his mind was made up that he was going to [use] his firearm when he got there," Matthews said.

Matthews said the police "have no records of anybody making any other reports" on Tilghman in their system, though he did have a record of a 2003 arrest for domestic assault and battery from when he was 13 years old.

Matthews said that police have not found any record of Tilghman having mental health issues, though said that if someone is to commit "an act like this, you'd have to assume that he probably had a little bit of mental illness."

Tilghman fired "from the outside of the door into the restaurant," Matthews said, adding "to me, it looks like a random event."

"It could have been really tragic. Again, we're really blessed that only three people were shot and didn't lose their lives," Matthews said of the victims.

The National Rifle Association tweeted about the shooting on Thursday, touting it as an example of the idea that “the best way to stop a bad guy with a gun is a good guy with a gun,” an idea disputed by experts.

The gun rights group also used their tweet to send a message to Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin, who vetoed a bill that would have eliminated the requirement for people to have completed a firearms training course in order to carry guns in public. The NRA supported the proposed bill, but the Republican governor, who has supported concealed carry and open carry laws in the past, vetoed it.

“I believe the firearms laws we currently have in place are effective, appropriate and minimal, and serve to reassure our citizens that people who are carrying handguns in this state are qualified to do so,” she said in a statement explaining her veto.

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Scott Olson/Getty Images(SANTA FE, Tx) -- The parents of a 17-year-old boy gunned down in the Santa Fe High School shooting are suing the parents of the suspected teen shooter, alleging the suspect's mother and father were grossly negligent for failing to properly secure their guns and keep them out of the hands of a "monstrous murderer."

Dimitrios Pagourtzis, 17, allegedly burst into the Texas school May 18 with a shotgun and a .38-caliber revolver, both of which are legally owned by his father, where he "coldly and calculating shot and brutally murdered Christopher Jake Stone and numerous other innocent victims," according to the lawsuit filed by Stone's parents, Christopher Stone and Rosie Yanas.

Christopher Jake Stone and the nine others killed had the "innocent but terrible misfortune to be in the same school at the same time as the monstrous murderer who rampaged among them," according to the lawsuit, filed Thursday in Galveston County, Texas. "As each bullet ripped home, gone in an instant were lives not fulfilled, marriages not happening, children not born, the ripple effect of so many good people touching the lives of others stilled forever."

Stone's parents say Pagourtzis' parents were negligent for failing to properly secure the guns, letting Pagourtzis have access to the guns and ammunition, failing to get mental health counseling and services for their son, failing to properly warn the public about their son's "dangerous propensities," as well as "negligently entrusting their weapons" to him.

Stone's parents also claim gross negligence for the parents’ allegedly letting their son access their guns.

If the suspect didn't have the guns available to him, "his hidden black rage might well have continued to simmer within, but, the life's blood of his teachers and peers... would not have been so horribly, callously and needlessly spilled," the lawsuit said.

The suspect's father, Antonios Pagourtzis told Greece's Antenna TV last weekend that he thinks his son may have been bullied, saying, “My son, to me, is not a criminal, he's a victim.” He also said his son never showed signs of violence.

While it was Pagourtzis who allegedly pulled the trigger, the lawsuit alleges that "pressed just as firmly were the fingers of his parents who utterly failed to teach their son any respect for life whatsoever and who negligently and grossly negligently failed to secure their weapons in a reasonable and prudent way and put them directly and proximately into use as authors of community-wide tragedy and incomprehensible loss."

"We are as shocked and confused as anyone else by these events," the Pagourtzis family said in a statement Saturday. "We are gratified by the public comments made by other Santa Fe High School students that show Dimitri as we know him: a smart, quiet, sweet boy. While we remain mostly in the dark about the specifics of yesterday’s tragedy, what we have learned from media reports seems incompatible with the boy we love."

"We extend our most heartfelt prayers and condolences to all of the victims," the Pagourtzis family said. "We also wish to thank all the first responders from all over Texas that assisted in rendering aid and support."

"We share the public’s hunger for answers as to why this happened, and will await the outcome of the investigation before speaking about these events," the family said. "We have been and will continue to cooperate with the authorities conducting the investigation, and ask for the public’s patience while it moves forward."

Pagourtzis, who is charged with capital murder, has been held at the Galveston County Jail without bond.

His attorneys filed a motion Wednesday requesting that a "reasonable bond" be set. The attorneys argue that Pagourtzis has a constitutional right to a reasonable bail and they, furthermore, state that his family has the means to post that bail.

Pagourtzis' attorneys did not specify what they consider a "reasonable bond" to be.


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iStock/Thinkstock(NOBLESVILLE, In.) --  A middle school boy allegedly opened fire at an Indiana school Friday morning, police said, leaving a teacher and another student injured, the latest in a string of school shootings this year.

"I heard gunshots and a few screams," a seventh-grader who was across the hall from the shooting told ABC News. "I was scared, I was in shock."

The suspected shooter, a student at Noblesville West Middle School, located about 27 miles north of Indianapolis, asked to be excused from class and then returned to the room armed with two handguns, Noblesville Police Chief Kevin Jowitt said at a news conference.

The teacher and student victims were shot in that room, Jowitt said, adding that the situation was resolved quickly and the suspect, who wasn't injured, was taken into custody.

The two victims were taken to local hospitals. Authorities did not provide their conditions.

One student said he was in class taking a test when the suspect came in with a handgun and started shooting aimlessly, "waiving his hand around," reported ABC affiliate RTV in Indianapolis.

The teacher allegedly stopped the shooter, the student told RTV.

"I was thinking, 'It's not real, it's not real, everything is going to be OK,'" student Gabbie Manns told ABC News of her time barricaded in the classroom. "We are holding hands holding tight ... people I didn't even know that well came over and held my hand and we all felt really united at that moment."

"There was people crying ... it was really chaos," she added. "I thought about all the other school shootings."

Tanner, an eighth grader, said he was in class when he saw kids running and screaming.

“There was only three of us, we had to barricade the door to make sure no one came in,” he told ABC News.

“I was shaking for my life,” he said, overcome with emotion. “I just didn’t wanna die.”

Kendall, a sixth grader, said she heard an announcement over the intercom, telling students to get in their rooms and barricade the door. She and her classmates got in the corner and the teacher turned off the lights.

“I was really scared, I didn't really know what was going on,” she told ABC News. “My teacher let me use his phone to call my mom.”

"I heard gunshots and a few screams," seventh-grader CJ Livingston, who was in a classroom across from the shooting, told ABC News. "We were all trying to be quiet and there were a lot of people crying around me."

"I was scared, I was in shock. I didn’t really know what to do," he continued. "I just thought I really needed to protect my peers and my friends and if something happened, I was petrified."

He said they threw chairs at the door as a barricade and then lined up behind the desks to hide.

"When I think about how that really must have felt for him I start sobbing," CJ's mother, Kristin Huber, told ABC News. "Something you don’t want your children to ever have to experience."

"When you get a text message from your son saying, 'Mom, there’s an intruder, I just wanted to tell you I love you,' just thinking about him texting me that is pretty tough," she said. "It was devastating. I was grateful when he let me know he was OK."

The school has a full-time school resource officer who was in the building at the time, Jowitt said.

The school does not have metal detectors, officials said.

At the nearby Noblesville East Middle School, "everybody just got so scared" and a lot of people were crying, one sixth-grade girl told RTV.

"It's a surreal feeling," the girl's dad added. "You don't think it's happening in your own town."

"A secondary threat" was also made at Noblesville High School, Jowitt said.

"We have not received any information that this has been anything other than a communicated threat," Jowitt said. "We are securing the high school and taking steps to make sure that it stays secure."

"All this says to me is insanity has hit Indiana," one man whose wife's grandson attends school in the district told RTV.

The man, who described the shooting as "chaos," said the boy texted his mother, "come get me."

The man, who described the shooting as "chaos," said the boy texted his mother, "come get me."

Vice President Mike Pence, an Indiana native, said he is "praying for the victims."

“To everyone in the Noblesville community -- you are on our hearts and in our prayers,” he wrote on Twitter. “Thanks for the swift response by Hoosier law enforcement and first responders.”

Gov. Eric Holcomb said he is monitoring the shooting.

"Our thoughts are with all those affected by this horrible situation,” Holcomb said.

Friday morning's shooting comes one week after a teenage boy allegedly stormed his Texas high school, shooting and killing 10 and wounding 13 others.

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- Harvey Weinstein turned himself into police in New York City Friday morning to face rape and sexual abuse charges before being released on $1 million cash bail and expected to wear an electronic monitoring device.

The disgraced movie producer was carrying three books, including Todd Purdum's "Something Wonderful: Rodgers and Hammerstein's Broadway Revolution," as he got out of a black SUV and walked past the swarm of TV cameras and reporters and through the front door of the New York Police Department's 1st Precinct in Manhattan.

He was subsequently arrested, processed and charged with rape, criminal sex act, sex abuse and sexual misconduct for alleged incidents involving two separate women, police said.

"Today’s charges reflect significant progress in this active, ongoing investigation," Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance said in a statement. "I thank the brave survivors who have come forward, and my office’s prosecutors who have worked tirelessly on this investigation."

Weinstein was later escorted out of the 1st Precinct with a smile on his face and his hands cuffed behind his back. He was then transported in an unmarked SUV to the New York State Supreme Court Building in Manhattan for his arraignment on the charges.

Judge Kevin McGrath set Weinstein's bond at $10 million, with $1 million paid in cash to post bail. The judge also imposed a temporary protective order directing Weinstein to stay away from the two women whose complaints prompted the charges.

Weinstein put up the $1 million in cash and was released. The case was adjourned to July 30.

Weinstein, who handed over his passport to authorities, will be fitted today with an electronic monitoring device that requires him to stay in New York or Connecticut. He must seek approval from authorities if he wishes to travel beyond those two states.

Weinstein's attorney Benjamin Brafman, who appeared in court alongside him, told reporters after the hearing that his client will enter a plea of not guilty on all the charges brought against him. They have known about the investigation for several months and the charges "are not factually supported by the evidence,” Brafman added.

When asked how Weinstein is doing, the attorney told reporters his client is "as well as can be expected when you are accused of a crime that you vehemently denied that you committed."

"We intend to move very quickly to dismiss these charges," Brafman said outside court. "We believe, by the end of the process, Mr. Weinstein will be exonerated."

In a separate statement, Brafman said, “Mr. Weinstein has always maintained that he has never engaged in non-consensual sexual behavior with anyone. Nothing about today's proceedings changes Mr. Weinstein's position. He has entered a plea of Not Guilty and fully expects to be exonerated.”

Weinstein, 66, has been accused by dozens of women of sexual misconduct and has been investigated by the New York City Police Department, the Manhattan District Attorney’s Office, the New York Attorney General’s Office, the Los Angeles Police Department and U.K. authorities. He has denied all allegations of nonconsensual sex.

The criminal sex act charge stems from an allegation brought by Lucia Evans, who has said Weinstein forced her to perform oral sex during what she thought would be a casting call. The rape charge stems from an allegation by a woman who has not been publicly identified.

Evans told Ronan Farrow of The New Yorker magazine last year that Weinstein forced her to perform oral sex on him in 2004.

Consequences for Weinstein were swift and severe. Immediately after the first allegations emerged last October, he was terminated by his production company and expelled from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.

His personal life imploded too. Weinstein's wife of more than a decade, Marchesa co-founder Georgina Chapman, announced that she was leaving him. Their divorce has yet to be finalized.

Weinstein voluntarily returned to New York to turn himself in rather than waiting for police to arrest him on their terms, in an attempt at "controlling the circus," a source familiar with the matter told ABC News.

Weinstein's legal and public relations teams realized that, in the current social and political climate, he would be indicted and arrested despite his consistent denial of nonconsensual sex, two sources told ABC News.

In an interview today on ABC News' "Good Morning America" with co-anchor Robin Roberts, Farrow said Weinstein's arrest was preceded by "a lot of sleepless nights" for Evans and the other accusers he spoke with.

"When I first began speaking to Harvey Weinstein's accusers, they were correctly terrified, they feared retaliation, they feared for their physical safety," Farrow said. "And now we live in a universe in which it is conceivable that survivors speak on an issue like this about someone that powerful and they're heard.”

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